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Question about female CC puppy's weight at 9 weeks?

ozaudioman

Member
Hello everyone...This is my first post on the forum.

I just brought home my first CC. She comes from a great breeder and blood lines. Both parents are fantastic and have beautiful temperaments. The dad weighs around 130lbs and mom right at 100 lbs. There were 11 pups in the litter and my girl was about avg. size and weight as her siblings. As I do my research on weight charts, I see the avg. female at 8 weeks old is about 16-18 lbs. My little girl is 9 weeks today and only weighed in at 13.6 lbs. I heard with larger litters the puppies can take a bit longer to get up to size, but this seems pretty light.

My question is...have any of you had the same experience from larger litter puppies? She's was weaned just shy of 4 weeks and has had no issues with puppy kibble. The breeder has feed her very good large breed puppy food and her poops have been perfectly normal since coming home. Great puppy so far. My Corso/Am Staff (95lbs for reference)loves her and even my cats are getting along with her. She's a little reserved but definitely has her spunky moments.

Any insight or responses would be appreciated. Here are a few pics.
 

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Boxergirl

Well-Known Member
Hi and welcome to the forum! Beautiful pup. Don't worry about her weight. I've seen the smallest pups end up the largest and the largest peter out and end up on the smaller side. She'll most likely be about the same as her parents. My Ella, an English Mastiff, was 12.4 lbs at 8 weeks, 26 lbs at 3 months, 42.8 lbs at 4 months, and 61 lbs at 5 months. (She was too big for me to weigh at home after that.) I was very concerned about how small she was. She matured at the low end of the standard, but definitely within the standard. Her adult weight stayed pretty steady at about 125-130. You can see from her picture at the left that she ended up being a big girl.

The charts are just guidelines and I know how easy it is to get concerned when you have a pup that seems not to conform to them. Ignore the scale and go by body condition. You want slow and steady growth and a lean puppy. Less weight on those growing bones is better. From the pictures, your girl looks perfect. Since her food seems to be working well for her, just go by the recommended amount and adjust up or down depending on her body condition.
 

ozaudioman

Member
Hi and welcome to the forum! Beautiful pup. Don't worry about her weight. I've seen the smallest pups end up the largest and the largest peter out and end up on the smaller side. She'll most likely be about the same as her parents. My Ella, an English Mastiff, was 12.4 lbs at 8 weeks, 26 lbs at 3 months, 42.8 lbs at 4 months, and 61 lbs at 5 months. (She was too big for me to weigh at home after that.) I was very concerned about how small she was. She matured at the low end of the standard, but definitely within the standard. Her adult weight stayed pretty steady at about 125-130. You can see from her picture at the left that she ended up being a big girl.

The charts are just guidelines and I know how easy it is to get concerned when you have a pup that seems not to conform to them. Ignore the scale and go by body condition. You want slow and steady growth and a lean puppy. Less weight on those growing bones is better. From the pictures, your girl looks perfect. Since her food seems to be working well for her, just go by the recommended amount and adjust up or down depending on her body condition.

Thank you. Yes, I agree...Her weight for her size I think is about right. I definitely don't want to put extra, unwarranted weight on her frame. These big dogs need slow and steady. I'm looking forward to watching all of her stages of growth, physical and mental. I'll keep updating for anyone that might have the same questions.
 

ozaudioman

Member
UPDATE....

Little Leia is still a little light in the britches but she is starting to fill out. She's turning into a beautiful Corso. Here's an updated picture at 18 weeks and 40.4 Lbs. The one with her "big brother" (they are not related) is at 16 weeks. He is a mix AmStaff/Corso/Neapolitan.
 

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ozaudioman

Member
Starting to grow into her skinny "little body" Just turned 29 weeks ( 6.5 months ) and hit the scales today at 68 lbs. New Zealand Kibble and Raw diet. close up.JPG
 

glen

Super Moderator
Staff member
Shes beautiful, shes also looking good, shes not overweight which is always best. Weve got an 11 week old pup, very similar marking on his chest.
 

arcc3617

Well-Known Member
She is a beautiful pup. Corso pups are so much fun. They are spunky, smart, and easily trained. Our 4 month old male is center of attention at the Farmer's Market. We try to get him down there every week
 

ozaudioman

Member
Thanks for the reply's....I'm bias but she's a great one. Very obedient and excellent listener. Training a little everyday is very important with this breed.

Here's One more Leia 55.jpg
 

ozaudioman

Member
She is a beautiful pup. Corso pups are so much fun. They are spunky, smart, and easily trained. Our 4 month old male is center of attention at the Farmer's Market. We try to get him down there every week
That's Awesome! We take ours everywhere too. Socialize Socialize Socialize. I'd love to see some pics of your pup. They all have their own look and personality.
 

Mag-Pie

Well-Known Member
Magnificent pup, love the beautiful photos. She's growing into a really good looking Corso, light and sleek, not overweight. Good job. Consistency is the key to training, and it never ends, you should have a great foundation before she reaches her teenage phase, and adolescent period. I distinctly remember that time. ;)
 

ozaudioman

Member
Magnificent pup, love the beautiful photos. She's growing into a really good looking Corso, light and sleek, not overweight. Good job. Consistency is the key to training, and it never ends, you should have a great foundation before she reaches her teenage phase, and adolescent period. I distinctly remember that time. ;)
Just noticed this post after posting on your pics of Luther. Thanks...We definitely agree on the importance of lifelong training and teaching. I wish every Corso owner understood this. With the popularity of the breed, I'm afraid of what some unscrupulous Corso owners might do to the reputation of the breed. In the right hands, best dog breed around.
 

Mag-Pie

Well-Known Member
Just noticed this post after posting on your pics of Luther. Thanks...We definitely agree on the importance of lifelong training and teaching. I wish every Corso owner understood this. With the popularity of the breed, I'm afraid of what some unscrupulous Corso owners might do to the reputation of the breed. In the right hands, best dog breed around.
Absolutely, we agree. Training, socialization, desensitization are crucial to the proper development of this type of dog. And, it’s a life long process. These are strong working dogs, if they don’t have a job, they will find one themselves. I remember this breed became very popular around 2013, and it seemed very “trendy” or “edgy” to have one. The following year, many of these dogs were no longer puppies and were getting re-homed; in my area you could find an advertisement in local pages for numerous 14-18 month old dogs needing a new home because they became “too difficult” for their owners to deal with, every week. It was horrible. Then a very unfortunate incident occurred in the area, and the owners were tried and convicted, because they were responsible for what their dogs did… Things became very serious and clear this breed was not for everyone, and it required a very responsible and thoughtful owners. I believe the couple became the first people in Michigan history to be charged with second-degree murder in connection with a dog attack. They were also charged with possession of a dangerous animal causing death, and were sent to prison, after pleading to Felony Manslaughter. The dogs were put down, as expected. The whole thing was very sad, a preventable tragedy on all accounts, and it should have never been allowed to happened, IF only the owners were more aware and understood what they had. The only reason I bring this up is that I think the reputation, in some areas, is already established, which is why I took extra precautions to never have my own dog in any such situation. He came to me as a very willful, untrained and aggressive 14 month old that already had a history of biting, the people who raised him since he was a puppy. If I didn’t take him on, he would have been put down, since he posed a potential danger. But, I decided to work with him, and the rest is history. :)
 

ozaudioman

Member
Absolutely, we agree. Training, socialization, desensitization are crucial to the proper development of this type of dog. And, it’s a life long process. These are strong working dogs, if they don’t have a job, they will find one themselves. I remember this breed became very popular around 2013, and it seemed very “trendy” or “edgy” to have one. The following year, many of these dogs were no longer puppies and were getting re-homed; in my area you could find an advertisement in local pages for numerous 14-18 month old dogs needing a new home because they became “too difficult” for their owners to deal with, every week. It was horrible. Then a very unfortunate incident occurred in the area, and the owners were tried and convicted, because they were responsible for what their dogs did… Things became very serious and clear this breed was not for everyone, and it required a very responsible and thoughtful owners. I believe the couple became the first people in Michigan history to be charged with second-degree murder in connection with a dog attack. They were also charged with possession of a dangerous animal causing death, and were sent to prison, after pleading to Felony Manslaughter. The dogs were put down, as expected. The whole thing was very sad, a preventable tragedy on all accounts, and it should have never been allowed to happened, IF only the owners were more aware and understood what they had. The only reason I bring this up is that I think the reputation, in some areas, is already established, which is why I took extra precautions to never have my own dog in any such situation. He came to me as a very willful, untrained and aggressive 14 month old that already had a history of biting, the people who raised him since he was a puppy. If I didn’t take him on, he would have been put down, since he posed a potential danger. But, I decided to work with him, and the rest is history. :)
So amazing...Luther got lucky!!