Anybody into soap making?

Discussion in 'Hobbies' started by Kimbersmama, Sep 11, 2013.

  1. Duetsche_Doggen

    Duetsche_Doggen Well-Known Member

    Certainly not trying to make a quick buck more interested in saving them lol! Just thought it would be interesting to do given the harsh chemicals in commercial soap.
     
  2. Boxergirl

    Boxergirl Well-Known Member

    I think my foot must just want to be in my mouth today! I'm sorry. That wasn't aimed at you either. Seriously, you can't imagine the people that used to come to my booth and think that they could become rich making soap. Making soap is terrific fun! You can even make a really decent bar with grocery store oils and lye from Lowes. If you're really interested and want some basic books to help you learn send me a PM. I have a few sitting here that I don't use anymore.
     
  3. Duetsche_Doggen

    Duetsche_Doggen Well-Known Member

    Lol! No harm done. Times are tough and people are looking to anything to make a quick buck so it doesn't surprise me. Check your box ;)
     
  4. ruthcatrin

    ruthcatrin Well-Known Member

    Its definetly not cheap. I looked at it breifly when my friend started. She sent me links for some of the places she ordered from. Unless you plan to do alot its not cheap. On the other hand I now give soaps as birthday/christmas/new baby gifts. I can almost always find a scent combo people like. And it makes my friend some extra cash. And I love it. Her soaps are MUCH less drying for my skin, and I can pick scents and mixes that suit me.
     
  5. Kimbersmama

    Kimbersmama Well-Known Member

    A lot of commercial soaps are technically detergent bars. Making your own is a really good way of actually knowing what's in the soap. That's why I started doing it in the first place!
     
  6. Duetsche_Doggen

    Duetsche_Doggen Well-Known Member

    Yeap this is where I'm getting at. I starting DIY on quite a bit of things. Food being the biggest everything I make is from scratch basic ingredients and preparations. If I can I like to branch out in other areas. I'm pretty sure as nice as the DOVE soap is I use its probably doing more harm than good to my skin....I don't know much about soap but one could only guess.
     
  7. neona

    neona Well-Known Member

    I was getting into personal care products with my ex years ago. He was fascinated by the chemistry for the soap making. I worked on lotion and lip balm. It was fun, but definitely not inexpensive. I belonged to a forum called, I think, the dish. When we moved I had a difficult time with the set up in the new house and after the divorce there just wasn't enough space or money. I also had a friend who made soaps that were fabulous for eczema.

    Sent from my phone please excuse to typos.
     
  8. NeSaxena

    NeSaxena Well-Known Member

    Considering the DIY trip I've been on recently, this is an awesome thread! Thanks for sharing!
     
  9. TN Dogues

    TN Dogues Well-Known Member

    Hubby and I made soap 15+ years ago. Before homemade soap really became popular. It was difficult to get even $2 a bar. And it wasn't cheap to make.

    We did not formulate soap for dogs. However, we did make several recipes which some of our customers used on their dogs with good results. One contained oatmeal and the other had ground coffee (our Odor Eater bars). We made it for my hubbys dad who fished a lot and needed a soap to get the stink off.

    I always enjoyed the chemistry of soapmaking, but it was an expensive hobby. We used a very simple base recipe: 30/30/30/10
    30 percent of coconut, olive, and palm oil.
    10 percent total of coco butter, shea, hemp, or jojoba. hemp was our favorite for soft skin - but super expensive.
    1.5% vitamin E oil. (Only extra oil in batch.)
    Enough lye to 100% saponification – no excess oil. Must be exactly weighed.

    Our bars were hard, lasted an extremely long time without spoiling and lathered well. With the addition of the 10% ‘luxury’ ingredients they were also very easy on the skin. Any extra’s like oatmeal, coffee, were added last. For scents we always used essential oils rather than fragrance oils – as the essential oils were far stronger.

    Hope my 02 cents helps.
     

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