Parvo Aftermath

Discussion in 'Health & Nutritional Care' started by RavensPack, Apr 12, 2014.

  1. RavensPack

    RavensPack New Member

    She has already eaten around 2 pounds of food today. She scarfed lunch down also... Just chicken this time. I did add some breast meat too. I'm thinking she is fine.

    I think I am just paranoid because of everything we have been through with her this far. And being new to raw feeding on top of it...
     
  2. musicdeb

    musicdeb New Member

    Good to hear that she's eating! Try to up the meat and instead of a lot of meaty bone.

    Did I read that you are going to spay her at about 17-18 weeks of age?
     
  3. RavensPack

    RavensPack New Member

    Yeah, I definitely think we need to give her less meaty bone. Her poops are a little on the hard side.

    and Yes... She is scheduled to get spayed Monday. She will be 18 weeks. The rescue we got her from is very sketchy (or so we found out afterward). She was not supposed to be up for adoption when we got her. She was supposed to already be spayed. Lot of rules were broken to say the least. Then a day and a half after we got her, she got parvo. Vet wanted her good and healthy before we spayed her.
     
  4. musicdeb

    musicdeb New Member

    Dogs should not be spayed until 18-24 months to have a healthy dog. As a female, spaying this young could lead to spay incontinence. Dogs need the hormones to grow healthy.
     
  5. RavensPack

    RavensPack New Member

    Interesting... I didn't know that. Wonder why all of the rescues spay them at 8-10 weeks then...
     
  6. musicdeb

    musicdeb New Member

    Because they are idiots and they are setting up the dogs to possibly be unhealthy and have growth problems. More and more vets are coming around to the fact that early neuter/spay causes more harm than good. The only time a dog should be de-sexed early is if there are medical issues, i.e. pyrometra in females.
     
  7. musicdeb

    musicdeb New Member

  8. Smokeycat

    Smokeycat Well-Known Member

    One goal of most rescues is to prevent more puppies from ever needing to be rescued. The most efficient way is to never let an intact animal be adopted out because then they would have to trust that they would be altered and never bred. Birth control over rides any future health concerns. In fact many people that are die hard spay/neuter will deny that there are any negatives.
     
  9. musicdeb

    musicdeb New Member

    Most rescues and animal shelters usually neuter at 6 months or later. I've noticed that rescues/humane societies in FL are neutering them as early as 6 weeks. My friend adopted a puppy from a humane society in Tampa and they neutered the whole litter at 6 weeks old and she adopted the puppy at 7 weeks.
     
  10. RavensPack

    RavensPack New Member

    18 - 24 months? Did you mean weeks? We read and were told that her chances of cancer drastically go up once she starts heat cycles... and continue to go up with every cycle that passes...
     
  11. musicdeb

    musicdeb New Member

    Yes, 18-24 months.
     
  12. musicdeb

    musicdeb New Member

    That is a slim possibility as well with altered dogs. Taking a chance on her not getting cancer, while a slim possibility, versus having a healthy pup.

    Go with your gut and do the right thing for you and the pup after doing the research.
     
  13. RavensPack

    RavensPack New Member

    Ive read three journal articles on spay incontinence that say you should do it after 3 months of age, but before her first heat cycle... One even studied getting it done after their first heat cycle and it said if you wait until after, they are more likely to develop spay incontinence.
     
  14. angelbears

    angelbears Active Member

    For the giant breeds and some large breeds waiting to spay is suggested until at least 18 months. My understanding is that hormones play an important role in healthy growth and you want to wait until growth plates are fused. The giants take a long time to grow. I spayed my two small breed dogs ASAP, they are both about 45 pounds. Anything that is going to get close to or over 100 lbs. I would wait.

    The counter argument is there is a chance of Pyrometra as they get older. The other risk is anesthesia(trickier with the large breeds) which is a risk no matter but more so as they get older.
     
  15. DMikeM

    DMikeM Active Member

    Early spay neuter can promote many known bone diseases in large breeds including but not limited to hip dysplasia, CCL (knee) Failures, cancers of the bone and arthritis. All of these scare tactics about uterine diseases are just there to make you want to spay your dog. Big cash cow for the veterinary industry. You also limit your dogs ability to mature properly by shutting off the hormones that regulate growth. Think of removing hormones from a human child around 10 years old.
     
  16. ruthcatrin

    ruthcatrin New Member

    The ONLY cancer who's risk is increased by delaying spaying is mammary cancer (and even then its only about a 30% risk, AND its rarely fatal) however by spaying early you're INCREASING her risk for several other cancers, which are all HIGHLY fatal. I'll dig out the links.

    If you have a contract with the rescue you may not have a choice, but if you DO have a choice please consider leaving her intact till she's 1.5 or later.
     
  17. ruthcatrin

    ruthcatrin New Member

  18. RavensPack

    RavensPack New Member

    Thanks everyone :) We canceled the spay appointment. We are still taking her in for her last of the puppy vaccinations and worm stuff. Figured while we are there we can discuss her weight with the vet and make sure medically there is nothing wrong.
     
  19. musicdeb

    musicdeb New Member

    Good to hear you came to a decision re: spay. :)
     
  20. RavensPack

    RavensPack New Member

    She still isnt eating enough. She isnt gaining weight. She often snubbs her nose at breakfast (thinking she just doesnt like eating in he morning??). She eats an average of 2 pounds a day. Solid poop for the last 2-3 weeks for the most part. Have added in turkey and pork sparingly (always a combination in one of her meals with chicken per day). She only gets treats on days she eats (dehydrated chicken or frozen small bits of chicken).

    Vet is getting worried and wants to switch her to a higher calorie density food (aka Rx kibble)... We dont want to do that. Worm test came back negative, but doc put her on deworming meds just in case. He is stumped as to why she isn't gaining weight. Said if she doesnt gain by next appointment (2-3 weeks out) we will do more bloodwork (full GI/liver panel).

    Stats are below...
    Date Weight Pounds of Food
    16-Apr 21 0.50
    17-Apr 20.4 0.50
    18-Apr 19.6 1.50
    19-Apr 21 2.50
    20-Apr 20.8 2.75
    21-Apr 21 2.25
    22-Apr 20.8 2.25
    23-Apr 20.8 0.25
    24-Apr 21.2 3.00
    25-Apr 20.4 3.00
    26-Apr 21 2.50
    27-Apr 21.4 2.00
    28-Apr 21.2 2.00
    29-Apr 20.4 3.50
    30-Apr 21 1.50
    1-May 21.4 1.75
    2-May 20.6 2.00
    3-May 20.2 1.00
    4-May 20.2 2.00
    5-May 20.4 1.00 so far today

    Any suggestions are greatly appreciated!!
     

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