8 1/2 week cane corso German shepherd

Discussion in 'Cane Corso' started by danniellehorton, Apr 19, 2017.

  1. danniellehorton

    danniellehorton New Member

    So we drove four hours a couple days ago and picked up our sweet boy I'm just curious how protective others cane corso's mix or not are I walk our boy three times a day leash training him and he's also in the yard pretty much as much as he wants to be but when I'm walking him day or night as soon as he sees someone walking down the street this person could be on the other side of the street or on a crossing street we are not on he will freeze his hole body and watch that person tell he can no longer see them is this a good sign with the proper training he will protect my self and kids and home if he needs too? [​IMG]


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  2. marke

    marke Active Member

    I'd keep him walking , distract him or take him over to meet the person if they would agree ...... nothing good comes from that behavior ...... imo
     
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  3. danniellehorton

    danniellehorton New Member

    Okay in our park walks and day time walks I let people pet him but at night I don't live in the best neighbourhood so I don't talk to anyone I've tried keeping him walking but he refuses to move until he can no longer seen the person and the people that do pet him he still watches them after I've had to pick him up a few times and walk down the street n put him back down n he walks again but he 30lbs I can't continue picking him up lol his going to be way to big for that


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  4. Nik

    Nik Well-Known Member

    My Kahlua is part Cane Corso and she has the same behavior traits. She is suspicious and watchful of strangers . Work on the walking as you want the pup to be able to walk without having to stop and go into alert mode anytime another person passes.

    I don't introduce my dogs to strangers at all though except on the rare occasion. I don't really like strangers or meeting people (kind of an extreme introvert). So I prefer them to ignore people.
     
  5. danniellehorton

    danniellehorton New Member

    I would love him just to ignore people but I want him to be friendly with everyone unless he should be protecting like my kids or house I'm going to start a treat destruction and see how that works


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  6. marke

    marke Active Member

    don't let him meet strangers at night , but don't let him fixate on them , distract him with treats ...... not letting a dog meet strange people will not make a protection dog , more often than not you'll just make a timid dog that can be run off more easily .......the reality of protection dogs , unless you got just an outright dangerous dog , if they're not raised and trained to fight a man , their not going to ......... as far as protection i'd think a dog is good for intimidation , alert and attention , a ccw is best for protection ............
     
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  7. Hector

    Hector Well-Known Member

    He's too young for you to be thinking about letting him act that way. Remember this dog will become large and powerful one day. You need to focus on his ability to engage and listen to you. Continue socialization and focus on his training. Lots of people struggle with just the basics around distractions like being able to heel and ignore distractions at the same time for example. You won't know if a loud barking lunging dog will protect you unless it is stress tested by someone in a bite suit when mature.

    Stop letting people pet him, period. Focus on the basics. You want a calm controlled dog in public that won't go psycho on people.
     
  8. danniellehorton

    danniellehorton New Member

    Okay thank you for the tip no more petting he's been doing better with a treat destruction still watches ppl but starting to get over it we will get him passed that with time his walking is perfect he never leaves my side and basic house training is pretty much done he's very smart


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  9. marke

    marke Active Member

    personally I'd pay strangers to meet my dogs and be friendly to them .....most folks are afraid of my dogs from a very young ages , their reaction to my dogs when young is not a good thing for the dogs/pups to see , when someone is willing to properly interact with my dogs I appreciate it and thank them everytime ......... my dogs are also taught when it's not ok to meet someone ......... dogs instinctively have a fear of the unknown , it's an ingrained survival instinct ...my dogs are never shy or timid of anything ..... when you have 5-8 dogs at a time you figure out how to make them non-problematic real fast ............. a dog that doesn't like or distrust unknown people is a problem and a liability , a large dog even more so ....... I assure you 9 times out of 10 not liking or distrusting strangers is not in the best interest of the dog ...... liking strangers also has nothing to do with protection work ......... to teach a dog to be distrustful of folks they don't know is without a shred of doubt unnecessary and a mistake ......... 9 out of 10 folks can't handle a dog properly anyway , let alone a distrustful one , or one that will bite ...... I've spent a lifetime teaching dogs not to bite and still had some bites ..... folks thinking they want a biting dog , just don't know or care about the responsibility to the dog and the folks that come in contact with them ......
     
  10. lexinrose

    lexinrose Member

    My dog was and is the same way. I work with her when I see a stranger I say keep going and I step up my pace like I have some where to go. I step up the pace before the dog sees the person.I don't let the dog decide that she can stop. When I see someone heading our direction I give a friendly hello which now at 1 year 4 months when people greet back she is more relaxed than with someone that doesn't respond. Also anybody heading my direction I either cross the street walking briskly. Or say firmly let's go.

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  11. lexinrose

    lexinrose Member

    Your pups so adorable .

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  12. DennasMom

    DennasMom Well-Known Member

    I would work on commands like "leave it" and "with me" (or "heel") and "let's go".

    So, when you see the 'stranger' coming, and start to see the puppy react by slowing down and fixating, give a soft "no" and/or "leave it" and then a "with me... let's go"... and keep walking. When the puppy looks back to you, give a "good boy!" and keep walking... Don't let the puppy dictate your reaction, provide guidance on how you want the puppy (and the adult dog) to react, and then reward the reaction you like.

    For us, my puppy wanted to MEET every person and dog on the street... I taught her to step off the sidewalk (normally into the nearest driveway) and "sit" and "wait" until the strangers walked by. Some would stop to say hi and then I would give Denna the "OK" to go and meet them, but she was (supposed) to sit and wait for the release before going after strangers (normally with intent to lick). We made it a very consistent habit. She's still very good at sitting and watching people walk by... even if they have crazy dogs with them that want to get to her (although, that is a much harder challenge).

    Your new puppy definitely a cutie!!
     
  13. danniellehorton

    danniellehorton New Member

    Thank you everyone for your advice he has been doing much better still try's to watch ppl but treats have been working good to keep his attention on me will walking


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  14. Vantage

    Vantage Member

    Did you buy the Puppy with the Sole Intention of Professional Protection Work? If not, do not count on him protecting you. (Even then, it would take a lot of Training, and protection work usually is not started fully until the puppy is an Adult.) As cool as it sounds, and as neat of an idea it may be in your mind, the fact of the matter is.... if that situation was to arise your dog would be in Real Danger! (Plus depending where in the World you Live, that could mean losing your dog - in a legal perspective.)

    As a pack leader, YOU are the one who is supposed to Protect YOUR Pack. Not the other way around as most new owners believe.

    Obedience and Control play somewhat of a role here, but......
    The key in this situation is to be INFINITELY MORE exciting than whatever Distraction is in front of your dog, whether it be a food or toy distraction and your own verbal praise. (WHO Cares if you Look Silly :p.)
     

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